Published on:
Sunday, June 20, 2021

COVID-19 is a Boon or a Bane for Cannabis Market in Canada?

The cannabis market saw a growth in sales from 180,692 dollars in March 2020 to 256, 670 dollars in September 2020, a 70% increase. Why? The COVID-19 pandemic. However, the Canadian cannabis industry experienced slow growth between the 2018 legalization and when the virus hit. The lag was due to competition from the black market weed sales because people preferred the lower prices.

Because of the stay-at-home policies, most people had to work from home, while others minimized contact with dealers. Furthermore, the movement restrictions gave people more time at home promoting online weed purchases from leading stores like Just Cannabis Store.

 

Here are more ways the virus has impacted the industry.

Increased Weed Consumption

COVID-19 caused established users to panic-buy weed. People did that to reduce contact with the dispensaries and stores, thus positively affecting retail sales.

The COVID-19 virus was a significant cause for panic and distress, and cannabis could help with that as research supports the plant’s use to induce relaxation, alleviate depression, induce euphoria and can be used as a food for the brain. People found relief in weed because of its therapeutic effects.

Weed’s active ingredients are known as cannabinoids, they have various medical benefits, and you’ll see how the compounds helped people below:

Weed for Depression and Anxiety Relief

Weed products rich in Cannabidiol or CBD helped with depression and anxiety. Studies on CBD support that the compound works with the endocannabinoid system to help manage the ailments. Moreover, CBD does so without causing significant side effects instead of.’ pharmaceutical drugs for the same conditions.

Weed for Recreational Purposes

 

 

Night clubs, events, parks, and other public gathering places closed during the pandemic, and people were bored, but luckily weed could help. Weed products high in THC content made fun possible because it causes users to get ‘stoned’. When ingested, the pot could elevate their mood and induce euphoria.

More Cannabis Stores Opened

Cannabis retail stores were declared essential services during the pandemic. These laws meant that the government treated the stores like pharmacies where people had to get their remedies. The licensed companies could also deliver weed to consumer’s homes for convenience. Due to those reasons, the companies established a reputation as safe and reliable.

People are spending more on cannabis stores, and to meet the market demand, more stores had to open during the pandemic. For example, Ontario had zero stores on legalization, but over 180 stores came up to allow people access to weed conveniently during the pandemic.

More, Cheaper Weed

When people consumed more weed in the COVID-19 crisis, prices went down. The aim for weed legalization was to raise more tax money from the industry, thus the higher weed retail prices and low sales before the pandemic. However, as time went by, prices started to drop, and through supporting licensed cannabis farmers, more weed was grown. Therefore, people not only got to enjoy cheaper weed but also a high-quality product.

Increased Customer Loyalty to Cannabis Stores

The weed companies provided value to customers. The cheap, safe, and high-quality products earn customer loyalty. Some vendors also offered product discounts and loyalty rewards, and for that reason, people are more likely to buy weed from them even after the pandemic ends.

Help in Clearing Weed’s Reputation

 

The hemp industry had a positive contribution in helping fight COVID-19. The plant produced CBD for therapeutic purposes and provided cotton swabs and personal protective equipment in hospitals. The virus, therefore, provided an opportunity for weed to prove itself and change people’s perspectives on the plant.

COVID-19 was a Bane to the Weed Industry

The pandemic was not all positive to the market because the virus caused many disruptions in how entrepreneurs conducted the weed business.

Not only did COVID-19 pose a health risk to the staff and customers, but the business procedures also had to change. There were shipping delays, changes in operating hours, reduction of in-store shopping, and other measures to ensure safety. For companies that were not well grounded, these hurdles would mean a drop in sales.

Conclusion

Apart from severe implications for people’s mental and physical health, the coronavirus has affected many businesses, greatly impacting the economy. But the declaration of cannabis manufacturers, shops, warehouses, and distributors as essential services in some areas like Alberta was a lifesaver to the industry. Opening the cannabis businesses ensures that users accessed the products while observing the safety measures.

Is COVID-19 a boon or bane for the cannabis market in Canada? Well, everything points out COVID-19 is a boon. Weed helped people get through the pandemic through medical effects and contributed to hospitals with protective equipment, which caused an increase in demand for the product. With the cannabis benefits and cut prices on high-quality weed, the cannabis market experienced significant growth.

Although there were a few challenges, like the social distancing measures, overall, cannabis users increased, and sales improved.

References

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2010000801&pickMembers%5B0%5D=2.30&pickMembers%5B1%5D=3.2&cubeTimeFrame.startMonth=10&cubeTimeFrame.startYear=2018&cubeTimeFrame.endMonth=09&cubeTimeFrame.endYear=2020&referencePeriods=20181001%2C20200901

https://www.healtheuropa.eu/health-benefits-of-cannabis/92499/

https://www.healthline.com/health/endocannabinoid-system

 

 

 

 

 

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